Response to John Carroll

Of course these are European decisions — but aren’t we free to criticize any restrictions on global free trade? Furthermore, there is absolutely no evidence that consumers have been adversely affected by the business policies of Microsoft. If anything, the company has been a great corporate citizen. I explain of of this in my forthcoming book.

J. Sagner

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3 Responses

  1. But look at it from the other direction: Is there any evidence that the EU’s economy has suffered because of their regulatory regime, or that the US economy has outperformed the EU’s economy *because of* it’s lesser regulatory burden?

  2. If anything, the company has been a great corporate citizen.

    Isn’t this begging the question?

  3. The macroeconomics of any large political/economic system are too complex to attribute to any one factor, be it tax policy, regulatory policy or any other issue. I’m certainly an advocate of some European initiatives; for example, in financial regulation — I’m thinking here of Britain’s single organization the FSA — which is far superior to the fragmented policy that we have in the U.S.

    As for Microsoft, I’m not sure how my response is begging the question but I’ll leave that to others to decide. Any comments out there?

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